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81 Los Angeles art galleries have joined together to create an online platform to promote engagement with the local and international art audience. Each week GALLERYPLATFORM.LA will present 10 gallery “viewing rooms” and 1 curated project. Galleries will appear on the platform once every 8 weeks.

The Box

Photo by Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Julien Bismuth & Sarah Conaway

The Box is pleased to feature artists Julien Bismuth and Sarah Conaway for the second week of Gallery Platform LA. Julien Bismuth (b. 1973, Paris, France, lives and works in New York) shares a selection of recent drawings, all featuring the classic 17th century commedia dell’arte stock character, Pulcinella, who is often hunchbacked, wearing a baggy, white costume and donning a long-beaked mask. Over the past 2 ½ months (since the beginning of the New York COVID-19 lockdown), Bismuth has rendered Pulcinella (directly translated to ‘little chicken’) onto found-images from newspapers, magazines, and advertisements. Sarah Conaway’s (b. 1972, York, Pennsylvania, lives and works in Los Angeles) photographic constructions are playful and formal, material yet philosophical. Her works engage and evoke surrealism and modernism, the decorative, and the ancient. They seek to inhabit and interrogate the representations of art history and language. She transforms meager materials— foil, fabric, cardboard, sticks, wire and styrofoam— into elegant arrangements: fabrics connote the draped figures of religious iconography, suggesting a human body underneath folds. Figures inhabit space in a moment of potential, where both thoughts and ideas become form. Bismuth and Conaway both mine art historical and philosophical narratives with a critical eye, recontextualizing and flipping classic modes of representation with acute formal experimentation.

Julien Bismuth, Pulcinella Study (Representing the jokes we did not tell each other), 2020
White ink and pencil on newspaper
7 3/10 × 6 inches

$3,000

Julien Bismuth, Pulcinella Study (Never by itself alone), 2020
White ink and pencil on newspaper
3 × 5 2/5 inches

$1,500

Julien Bismuth, Pulcinella Study (North), 2020
White ink and pencil on newspaper
10 × 8 3/4 inches

$4,000

Sarah Conaway, Branch II, 2015
Chromogenic Print
28 1/4 × 35 3/4  inches

$4,000

Sarah Conaway, Forms [Green], 2015
Chromogenic Print
24 3/4 × 30 3/4  inches

$4,000

Sarah Conaway, Fabric [Ascetics], 2015
Chromogenic Print
31 × 24 3/4 inches

$4,000

Karma International

Installation image of I Saw it in a Dream.

I Saw it in a Dream

In a time where the center does not hold, and the future is obscured, we are presented with the opportunity to embrace the uncharted waters in which we find ourselves and dive inwards. In this introspective spirit, Karma International presents I Saw it in a Dream, an insight into the visual language and subconscious of gallery artists, Meret Oppenheim, Elisabeth Wild, and Keiichi Tanaami. 

Encouraged by her psychoanalyst father, Oppenheim began documenting her dreams as a teenager, following the Jungian tradition of analysis. The works exhibited reveal a mature Oppenheim’s reaction to the Jungian concepts of  the Anima and the Animus, and the Archetypes. 

Similarly, Tanaami documented his dreams in the form of a diary. His dream drawings serve as stark psychedelic reactions to ideas surrounding the alienation of man, libidinal impulse, and his traumatic memories of the U.S. bombing of Tokyo. 

With harmonic compositions made out of images from the external world, Wild created in her collages a dream-like subconscious, transforming scraps from magazines into sublime worlds. These exceptionally vivid collages, termed “Fantasias” by Wild, present an intimate reflection of her internal world.

Together, these works offer a dialogue between three artists who share the ability to manifest the fantastical world of the subconscious into physical reality. 

Meret Oppenheim, Mädchen, Dreiviertel-Profil, 1975
Ink on paper
13 × 16 1/8 inches

CHF 35,000.00 Inquire

Meret Oppenheim, Zwei Gesichter, 1960
Pencil on paper
15 3/4 × 11 3/4 inches

CHF 40,000.00 Inquire

“Meret Oppenheim was able to transform the power of her internal visual vocabulary into visible, imagistic space,”—Valerie Export

Meret Oppenheim, Sechs Urtierchen und ein Meerschneckenhaus, 1978
Seven painted and glazed terracotta objects
Dimensions variable

CHF 52,000.00 Inquire

Keiichi Tanaami, Dream Diary Drawings, 2007-2013
Ink, colour pencil, (magazine scrap) on paper
15 × 20 × 1 1/8 inches

$ 5,000.00 Inquire

"There is no doubt that fear and apprehension along with anger and resignation surged through my dreams, in which the enigmatic monster of war chased down my boyhood, spent eating and playing to my heart's content. As I recall, one night during an air raid, I watched a fleeing mob of people from atop a hill. But, I wonder about this. I wonder if it actually happened. Dreams and reality are all jumbled up in my memories, stored in my mind in that ambiguous state."—Keiichi Tanaami

Keiichi Tanaami, Dream Diary Drawings, 2007-2013
Ink, colour pencil, (magazine scrap) on paper
15 × 20 × 1 1/8 inches

$ 5,000.00 Inquire

“I sometimes wonder if there can be a visual equivalent to labyrinths and culs-de-sac of one person’s mind and memory, and when I look at Elisabeth Wild’s collages, I imagine this equivalence very well. Through her work, I understood something of the way she understood and transformed the changing world that surrounded her during 98 years of her life on this planet.”—Adam Szymczyk

Elisabeth Wild, Untitled, 2019
Collage on paper
9 1/8 × 5 3/4 inches

$ 8,000.00 Inquire

Elisabeth Wild, Untitled, 2020
Collage on paper
8 1/2 × 6 1/8 inches

$ 8,000.00 Inquire

We use art to elucidate the inexplicable. Were history a single book, turn to the first page and you would find shamans painting their visions across the Caves of Chauvet. Dreams are dissected with symbols and metaphors, in a language which transcends reality but stops just short of fantasy.

Marc Selwyn Fine Art

Ways of Seeing 
Curated by Douglas Fogle

When Marc invited me to curate a selection of works for Platform LA, I was taken by the number of artists in the gallery’s program for whom the image machine of Hollywood is a major concern as well as an inspirational source. Thinking about our home in Los Angeles as a center of image production, Ways of Seeing brings together five artists who each critically engage with the image cultures of Hollywood, the fashion world, and television in photographic-based works that highlight the highly constructed artifice of our popular culture. Whether using techniques of appropriation or evoking mysterious or humorous narratives with their own photographs, each of these artists speaks to the necessity of exploring a world in which the dissemination of images has exploded exponentially, and a reality television star has ascended to the presidency.

— Douglas Fogle

Allan McCollum, Blazing Barriers: The Uncredited, 2019
Collection of five digital photos from vintage movie DVDs by artist, printed on canvas and framed
Installation dimensions variable

Available Inquire

Still from Blazing Barriers, 1937.

In Allan McCollum’s new series “The Uncredited,” the artist explores the collision of personal and cultural memory by appropriating and reproducing unidentified artworks from the sets of films of the 1930s and 1940s in which his father Warren McCollum appeared as an uncredited extra. Isolating artworks from the set of the depression-era film Blazing Barriers, McCollum digitally reproduces them on canvas in a blurry and almost abstract resolution. Ghostly in appearance, these unidentifiable Hollywood art props are both apparitions of the nameless players who provide the backdrop to Hollywood artifice but also markers of our own fallible personal memories.

Calling himself a “paraphotographer,” the legendary Los Angeles-based artist Robert Heinecken used photographic collage and appropriation to explore our culture’s production of meaning through an obsession with commercial images. In his works of the late 1980s—camera-less photograms that overprinted both sides of a magazine page as a result of the transparency of the original paper—Heinecken explored the creation of desire in advertising with a Dada-like collage technique that short-circuited the intended advertising messages. In his appropriated television image of the Reagans dancing in front of a photographic backdrop, the artist exposes the way in which image and politics collide—and continue to collide today—in a world of constructed reality.

Robert Heinecken, Catherine Deneuve, B & Bewitch, 1988
Dye bleach photogram from magazine page
13 × 10 3/4 inches

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Robert Heinecken, Reagan Dancing "B", 1986
Cibachrome print, offset lithograph TV mat
13 × 19 inches

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William Leavitt peels back the façade of Hollywood storytelling in his work The Tropics. In his installations, paintings, and photographs, Leavitt deploys fragments of popular culture modeled on the melodramatic narratives of B-movies and soap operas to reveal seams in the constructed illusions of the Hollywood backlot. In The Tropics the artist juxtaposes three black-and-white photos together—an image of a painting, a close up of a woman’s neck with a necklace, and an image of tropical plants. Leavitt asks us to imagine a possible story emerging from these cinematic stills—a man giving a woman a pearl necklace in a modern apartment with an “exotic” painting of a South American jungle cat on the wall and tropical plants in the courtyard.

William Leavitt, The Tropics, 1974
Three black and white photographs
9 ¾ × 15 ½ inches each

Available Inquire

Allen Ruppersberg’s 100 MPH creates a storyboard narrative through the montage of discrete images with a slight slapstick twist. In a sequence of five color photographs, the artist constructs a tragi-comic, quasi-cinematic scenario in which two toy cars find themselves involved in a fiery collision guided by the hands of the artist. The punchline occurs in the last “shot” depicting the artist face down and on fire, protected by a rented Hollywood stuntman’s fire suit.

Allen Ruppersberg, 100 MPH, 1972
5 color photographs
8 × 10 inches each

Available Inquire

Matt Lipps’ new series “Where Figure Becomes Ground” continues his ongoing fascination with the ecology of our culture’s image world. By appropriating photographs from iconic 1990s women’s fashion campaigns, Lipps brings them into a productive friction with images culled from US Camera Annual (1939-1969) which published photos by well-known modern photographers such as W. Eugene Smith, Ansel Adams, and Dorthea Lange. Cutting them out, collaging them together in an analogue manner and re-photographing these images, Lipps elevates the supposedly superficial “feminine” genre of fashion photography while interrogating the unexamined “heroic” qualities of the more “masculine” genres of documentary and art photography.

Matt Lipps, LoveNow, 2019
Archival pigment print
40 × 31 inches

Available Inquire

The Pit

FriendsWithYou booth installation with The Pit at Art Los Angeles Contemporary, 2018.

FriendsWithYou

FriendsWithYou, the collaborative artist duo of Samuel Borkson and Arturo Sandoval III, are well known for their unique experimental pop visions taking form in immersive installations, high fabrication sculptures, paintings, animation, live performances, virtual reality, and most recently their unique wall-bound reliefs made from plasticine. Forging their own brand of post-pop visual language informed by pioneers such as Takashi Murakami, Arturo Herrera, and Yayoi Kusama, FriendsWithYou takes a spiritual and serene approach to form and figure. FriendsWithYou have successfully impacted culture beyond the contemporary fine art realm, and have also become well known for their contributions to pop culture with multiple projects, such as co-creating the successful animation show True and the Rainbow Kingdom, participating in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade with a live performance and inflatable, and recently have received acclaim for producing visual experiences for musician J Balvin. By blurring the divide between perceived “high” and low” art, as explained in Murakami’s Superflat essay, FriendsWithYou utilizes other mediums like design and limited edition products from a fine art perspective. Their most important artistic tactic to foster these interpersonal relationships is the use of play. FriendsWithYou works are commonly populated with characters, either created or pulled from popular culture, often times associated with children’s entertainment such as Kermit the frog, Elmo, Bart Simpson, and many more. These characters create a visual language and set of references specific to the act of play, a tool for unstructured free association and interaction.

FriendsWithYou, Red Elmo, 2018
Plasticine clay in plexi frame
18 × 15 × 2 inches

$20,000 Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Minnie Black, 2018
Plastiline clay in plexi frame
18 × 15 × 2 inches

$20,000 Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Unified Field II, 2020
Plastiline clay in plexiglass frame
80 × 120 × 2 inches

Available Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Unified Field II, 2020

FriendsWithYou, Starbust, Toronto 2013

FriendsWithYou, Happy Rainbow, Hong Kong 2012

FriendsWithYou, Garfield, 2017
Plastiline clay in steel frame
16 × 12 × 3 inches

$12,000 Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Philip Guston, 2017
Plastiline clay in plexi frame
29 1/4 × 22 × 3 inches

$25,000 Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Spongebob and Donald Duck Study, 2017
Oil stick on Arches watercolor paper
34 × 25 inches

$8,500 Inquire

FriendsWithYou, Tweety, 2018
Oil stick on Arches watercolor paper
30 × 22 1/2 inches

$8,500 Inquire

FriendsWithYou’s work has been exhibited at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Art Basel in Miami Beach; Dallas Contemporary; Galerie Perrotin, Miami; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin; The High Line, New York; The Indianapolis Museum of Art; Marine Projects, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara; Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles; Oakland Museum of California, and most recently at NSU Art Museum in Ft. Lauderdale. FriendsWithYou works are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami, The Goldman Family Collection, Montblanc Collection, amongst others. FriendsWithYou and The Pit have forthcoming projects scheduled for 2021 and beyond.

FriendsWithYou released their Rizzoli published monograph We Are FriendsWIthYou in May 2014. The book spans their career thus far, and features contributions by musician, producer, and longtime collaborator Pharrell Williams; director Alejandro Jodorowsky; and Dallas Contemporary executive director Peter Dorshenko.

Regen Projects

Christina Quarles

Christina Quarles, I Think Yew've Made Yer Point Now, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
55 x 86 inches

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On view here for the first time, these six artworks by Christina Quarles showcase her virtuosic practice, highlighting the formal, conceptual, and aesthetic devices she employs to create rich and evocative works that teeter on the edge of representation and abstraction.

Quarles’ expressionistic and vividly hued paintings feature a singular lexicon that draws equal inspiration from the history of painting and popular American culture. Informed by her identity as a multiply situated queer woman of mixed race, the three paintings on view visualize the complicated and often fraught experience of inhabiting a body, a concept that is seen shifting and evolving across the picture plane. Polymorphous figures form the compositional structure of I Think Yew’ve Made Yer Point Now. Identified only through a smattering of body parts – heads, feet, hands, thighs, and breasts – they twist and contort into various states upon the surface of the canvas. Behold! And Be Held Beside Me evokes the art historical trope of the pietà, featuring lithe, overlapping figures firmly weighted by a palpable gravity that draws their cascading limbs downward. Perspectival planes – here in the form of a white picket fence – both serve to situate and bisect the bodies, drawing boundaries that contain and exclude forms, expanding the limits and potential for representation.

The three drawings on view feature Quarles’ signature elongated figures, deftly rendered through various modes of mark making. The scenes represented in this selection of images range from the cacophonous to the intimate and are at once dynamic and deceptively simple. Oftentimes her drawings are punctuated by text in the form of puns or poetic wordplay that reference pop culture and situate the works in our time. 

Christina Quarles, In My Heart, There Is Music, 2020
Ink on paper
13 x 19 inches

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“For Quarles, the disjunction between the fluid and the constructed is a formal manifestation of her experience in and of the world. It is how she expresses in painting her attitudes toward the possibilities and pitfalls of both fluidity and construction in real life.”

– Mark Godfrey, “Liquid Constructions” (MCA Chicago, 2020)

Christina Quarles, Behold! And Be Held Beside Me, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
72 x 60 inches

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“Shaped by a consideration of touch, intimacy, desire, and the literal and affective implications of each, Quarles’ body of work expands the lineage and lexicon of queer and feminists-of-color approaches to making sense of being in the world, particularly in those spaces framed by white heteronormativity… By suggesting new ways of dwelling in the practice of painting, Quarles proposes other potential pathways and spaces within which to exist.”

– Grace Deveney, “Forming Touch” (MCA Chicago, 2020)

Christina Quarles, Down N' Out, but Always Down, 2020
Ink on paper
13 x 19 inches

$10,000 Inquire

“Quarles’ explorations of ambiguity take her to a place of excess, where her layering of information bypasses singularity for simultaneity. In the process of becoming, Quarles’ bodies are also simultaneously coming undone.”

– Andrew Bonacina, “In Likeness” (The Hepworth Wakefield, 2019)

Christina Quarles, Push'm Lil' Daisies, Make'm Come Up, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
72 x 84 inches

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Christina Quarles (b. 1985, Chicago) lives and works in Los Angeles. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2016 and holds a BA from Hampshire College. Recent solo and group exhibitions include Radical Figures: Painting in the New Millennium, Whitechapel Gallery, London (2020); The Hepworth Wakefield, England (2019); Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (2018); Made in L.A., Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, New Museum, New York (2017); and Fictions, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2017); among others. In the spring of 2021 her work will be the subject of solo presentations at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, South London Gallery, London, and X Museum, Beijing. A fully illustrated catalogue featuring texts by Grace Deveney, Mark Godfrey, and Uri McMillan will be published to coincide with her exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

Christina Quarles, It'll Getcha, 2020
Ink on paper
13 x 19 inches

Sold

Shulamit Nazarian

Turn Back, Turn Back! Installation view, Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles, 2020

Turn Back, Turn Back! 
Through May 30th

Little did we know when we titled our current exhibition Turn Back, Turn Back! that we would have to temporarily close the gallery just days after opening. The exhibition features works by Diana Yesenia Alvarado, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Rainen Knecht, Lila de Magalhaes, Elham Rokni, Summer Wheat and Tori Wrånes. These artists explore narrative structures that resonate with a deep history of storytelling found in ancient myths, fables, and folktales. 
 
For our debut Gallery Platform LA presentation, we paired two established gallery artists with two emerging Los Angeles-based artists: Trenton Doyle Hancock with Diana Yesenia Alvarado, and Summer Wheat with Lila de Magalhaes.
 
Amalgamating images related to culturally significant stories, these artists examine how fables serve as guides to the unconscious, using metaphors to explore age-old fears, anxieties, and shared beliefs. We invite you to explore the exhibition in its entirety on our website!

Trenton Doyle Hancock, Mold, 2010
Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
60 × 60 inches

$65,000 Inquire

Trenton Doyle Hancock, Tooth Ring, 2001
Graphite on paper
10 1/4 × 11 3/4 inches

$8,500 Inquire

Trenton Doyle Hancock’s elaborate works interlace personal memoir with the history of painting and pop-cultural imagery. Hancock’s dense and subversive storylines employ tropes, ranging from comic-strip superhero battles to religious mythologies. Within this exhibition are significant works that illustrate the artist’s central character of the Mound, as well as depicting key moments in the origin of Hancock’s epic, decades-long myth narrative. For Hancock, the Mound is more than just a character; it is a way of life.

The Mounds exist for me on several different levels. The one that people key in on is that they’re these fantastical creatures, hybrids between humans and plants, that live in the forest. Typical fairytale stuff...Then there’s this other aspect of moundness, where I see each kind of individual being on earth as a mound, or as the keeper of their own individual universe...It’s a way of thinking about things, really.
 

–Trenton Doyle Hancock interviewed by Katy Henriksen, The Creative Independent

Diana Yesenia Alvarado and Trenton Doyle Hancock in Turn Back, Turn Back!, Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Diana Yesenia Alvarado, Amorcito corazón (keeper), 2019
Glazed ceramic, pedestal
16 × 9 × 6 1/2 inches

$4,000 Inquire

Diana Yesenia Alvarado, Alas y Rayo, 2020
Ceramic, glaze, gold
36 × 30 × 7 inches

$2,800 Inquire

Diana Yesenia Alvarado creates otherworldly and free-formed ceramic sculptures that are fantastical and historically referential, anthropomorphic, and gestural. Inspired by her childhood dreams and her hometown of East Los Angeles, Alvarado crafts cartoonish guardians on top of pedestals made of ornate security bars and cinder blocks.

Diana Yesenia Alvarado and Lila de Magalhaes in Turn Back, Turn Back!, Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Lila de Magalhaes, Young Fixation, 2019
Fabric, thread, and chalk pastel
57 × 48 inches

$7,000 Inquire

Lila de Magalhaes’ artworks employ fantastical imagery that combines ecstasy with moments of danger. Referencing Greek mythology, preteen obsessions, and her own daydreams, the artist’s work investigates fear and desire through the personification of otherworldly creatures in a toxic, yet loving relationship with humans.
 
In Young Fixation, 2019 a girl is blowing kisses to a horse, a common symbol of pre-teen infatuation, an animal becoming an object through desire.

Summer Wheat, Stepping on Snakes, 2018
Acrylic on aluminum mesh
68 × 94 inches

$35,000 Inquire

Summer Wheat’s tactile paintings merge process and narrative to ponder human experience through various moments in art history. Using an inventive process of pushing paint through aluminum mesh, Wheat’s large-scale paintings resemble medieval tapestries. 
 
Wheat focuses special attention on the connection between human and animal behavior, as seen in Stepping on Snakes. The shoes of a witch – a powerfully healing female figure that was historically persecuted by men for having agency – are stepping on a snake, a symbol associated with both evil and fertility. Wheat’s undermining of archetypal animals considers the fraught and mythic needs between woman, beast, and survival.

Summer Wheat, Mustard and Ketchup, 2017
Acrylic on aluminum mesh
64 × 36 inches

$12,000 Inquire

The experience of viewing Summer Wheat’s paintings and sculptures for the first time produces an inordinate number of pleasurable surprises. From afar, her large-scale wall pieces playfully fluctuate between being tapestries and paintings; yet upon closer inspection, they are indeed both. Wheat works by pushing thick, claylike paint through sheets of mesh. The resulting textures resemble rich, woven textiles, or rows of tassels.
 
 
–Amelia Rina, Artforum

Smart Objects

Installation view of Paul Rouphail’s Be Quiet at SMART OBJECTS in Los Angeles, California, 2020.

Paul Rouphail: Be Quiet

Graham Greene once defined melancholy as “the logical belief in a hopeless future.” Such is the sentiment many of my peers have expressed with respect to the rapidly changing climate and with regard to the current coronavirus pandemic and subsequent global economic recession. In the midst of our current lockdown measures, it is undeniable that the apprehension felt by millions regarding our collective political and environmental uncertainty is only intensified by our current predicament. 

Can artists do anything to abate the “hopelessness” to which Green alludes? Certainly there is an opportunity and responsibility for artists as citizens to participate in rigorous public debate about what faces all of us environmentally and fiscally. Simultaneously, however, there is also the question of relating aesthetics to the present problem: How can a painter engage the world without reducing his or her work into merely an absorption and reflection of such hopelessness? How can we avoid “flaunt[ing] alienation as if it were freedom,” as Hal Foster warns? Perhaps in our present moment this is not necessarily a question of what I am calling “transitive affectation”—of what to paint, but rather a condition of “intransitivity”—of how to bear witness through images. 

Paul Rouphail, Portrait, Red Room, 2020
Oil on linen 
55 × 47 inches

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Paul Rouphail, Two Trees, 2020
Oil on linen 
46 × 30 inches

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Installation view of Paul Rouphail’s Be Quiet at SMART OBJECTS in Los Angeles, California, 2020

Paul Rouphail, Choice, 2020
Oil on linen 
26 × 20 inches

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Presently, I’ve rediscovered the works of Goya and On Kawara. In particular, I find Goya’s peninsular war etchings, and On Kawara’s telegrams—“I am still alive”—as testaments to the endurance of the human record. That is, that these works communicate the urgency of recounting; that extreme events enlighten and alter our experience of the world in the aftermath. Goya’s etchings, for example, are titled in the affirmative: “I saw it”, “and this as well”. In a way both artists conflict with Giorgio Agamben’s notion that contemporariness is “...a singular relationship with one’s own time, which adheres to it, and at the same time, keeps a distance from it.” Quite the contrary, there is little “distance” in the work of Goya and Kawara, but instead, the deft verisimilitude and sobriety of the artists’ recounting of their immediate present. It is the precise time-fullness, rather than timelessness that projects these artists’ experiences into our contemporary crisis in a unique, more urgent light. Like a diary, their work is a means of recollection. 

Between January and May of this year, I completed ten paintings, some of which I made in my basement during Philadelphia’s stay-at-home order. While these paintings differ in affect from the work of Goya or Kawara, I have attempted to reflect their methods of recounting through my own aesthetic language. The last few years I have been making paintings of domestic spaces in which light transforms various chattel into objects of extraordinary presence. Now, and for the foreseeable future, the pandemic consigns me to my home, to dwell among my subjects. I count myself fortunate to be in such a position. From the vantage point of my ad hoc studio, I absorb the exhortations of friends, family, and public health officials as gospel: to stay home, to be present, to listen carefully, to be quiet. 

—Paul Rouphail, 5/14/2020

Paul Rouphail, Face, 2020
Oil on linen 
22 × 18 inches

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Paul Rouphail, Light of the World, 2020
Oil on linen 
46 × 42 inches

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Paul Rouphail, Be Quiet, 2020
Oil on linen 
30 × 22 inches

$5,000 Inquire

Installation view of Paul Rouphail’s Be Quiet at SMART OBJECTS in Los Angeles, California, 2020

Paul Rouphail, Evening Readers, 2020
Oil on linen 
58 × 50 inches

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Paul Rouphail  (b. 1987) received his BFA from Carnegie Mellon University, and his MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. His recent solo and group exhibitions include Stems Gallery, Brussels, Belgium; SMART OBJECTS, Los Angeles, CA; Jack Barrett, Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, Fisher Parrish Gallery, George Adams Gallery, Nancy Margolis Gallery, and Microscope Gallery, New York, NY; Fjord Gallery, and Little Berlin, Philadelphia, PA; The Miller ICA at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; and White Columns online. Rouphail's work has been reviewed online and in print, including the Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles, Artspace, New American Paintings, Juxtapoz Magazine, Maake Magazine, and Gestalten Press' Imagine Architecture, among others. Rouphail lives and works in Philadelphia, PA and is represented by SMART OBJECTS in Los Angeles and Stems Gallery in Brussels.

Sarah Lehrer–Graiwer

That Distancing Feeling
Curated by Sarah Lehrer–Graiwer

Six feet. We’ve gained a new radar for this radius. Proximity has become a problem. We improvise real and imagined protective screens in front of and around ourselves. The spheres we are able to safely occupy have contracted into lonely bubbles. Space gets measured by an empty arm’s reach. Empty chairs, empty benches, empty sidewalks, empty stores, empty restaurants, empty everything. The dream of a vast, deep, unpopulated beach has become an emblematic yearning for me, alongside the nightmare of any crowded place. This incomplete sadness of approaching family or friend, not too near and never making contact, circling like repellant magnets, this sustained dull sadness rolls over my inner landscape like a fog. I can only hug the two bodies with whom I live, so I try to hug them more. Living through the pandemic has immersed us in unprecedented contrasts and stark shades of isolation, distancing, and solitude—and the complicated ways that those involuntary states coexist with and produce different, compromised kinds of intimacies, exposing newly heightened sensitivities. On the one hand, I look to communities that have faced pandemic and survived through calculated separation and the refuge of private communion before, like the gay community. On the other hand, there’s also a new diachronic awareness of space, for instance, that we have honed, thinking about airspace shared not only concurrently but separately, sequentially over different spans of time that correlate to different levels of risk. Are droplets still lingering? What else from when and whom is in the air or, for that matter, in the ground? Space becomes experienced temporally, too. Or, the closed, hermetic family unit comes to mean differently, too, in sweet and uneasy ways: at the same time that we are isolated from friends and extended family, we are also in forced, full-time, relentless proximity with those at home. No break from that either, which throws off and taxes intimacy’s fine balance.

Covidian life of these past three months has been defined by various large and subtle losses and absences, waves of scarcities, cutting away and cutting off. That said, while the loss of habits and life as we knew it is extreme, I am reminded that not all cancelations are losses, many may also be a relief.

—Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer

Anthony Lepore, The Inside, 2017
Archival pigment prints and wood
36 × 29 × 3 1/2 inches
Edition of 1 + 1 AP

$8,500.00

Patrick Jackson
, Buried Alive, 2016

Concrete

34 × 26.5 × 12 inches

Available

Shahryar Nashat, Poser (Low-Angle), 2016
Silkscreen and inkjet print on paper, artist frame
36 × 48 × 1.5 inches

Available

Max Maslansky, Sardine Can, 2020
Glazed ceramic
7 × 2 1/2 × 3 inches

Sold

Max Maslansky, Fish Pile (tray), 2020
Underglazed ceramic
18 3/4 × 13 × 1/4 inches

Available

Shahryar Nashat, Rob It in Flesh (Tallulah), 2020
HD video on monitor with retrofitted cover
4:10 minutes
45 × 38 1/2 × 3 1/2 inches

Available

Shahryar Nashat, Rob It in Flesh (Tallulah), 2020
HD video on monitor with retrofitted cover
4:10 minutes
45 × 38 1/2 × 3 1/2 inches

Available

Amy Yao, Silent Sneeze I, no. 7, (little doggy), 2014
Polyester resin, fiberglass, rice paper, polyurethane
6 1/4 × 13 3/4 inches

Available

Dean Sameshima, In Between Days (Without You), 1998
C-type print
3 1/2 × 5 1/2 inches
Edition of 3 + 3 AP

Available

Dean Sameshima, In Between Days (Without You), 1998
C-type print
3.5 × 5.5 inches
Edition of 3 + 3 AP

Available

Dean Sameshima, Young Men at Play #6, 2004
Lightjet print
40 × 13 7/10 inches
Edition 1 of 2 + 1 AP

Available

Nancy Lupo, Bench, 2015
Concrete
23 × 52 × 21 inches

Available

Heather Rasmussen, Untitled (Butterfly legs on pillow), 2018
Pigment print
23 × 20 inches

Available

Brian Bress, Sunset Geometry, 2018
HD single-channel video (color), HD monitor and player, wall mount, franed
Excerpt of TRT: 28 min., 41 sec., loop
39 1/2 × 22 1/4 × 3 1/4 inches
Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles

William E. Jones, Gutter Collage 11 (Edward Kennedy—centerfold—Pollock—seashore—volcano—marine), 2018
Collage
12 7/8 × 19 5/8 inches

Available

Simone Forti, Tree Drawing: I Stand Where a Bear Stood Recently Clawing This Tree, 2010
Pencil, marker on paper
14 × 11 inches

$6,000